/page/2

Delays and setbacks

I’ve already failed to make this resurrected tumblr a weekly blog on writing process. But I should know by now that setbacks are inevitable for someone who never had much writing discipline in the first place. I want to offer some reasons why I failed not only to update this blog but also to work regularly on my writing sample these past couple of weeks.

It’s important to remember as well that setbacks are integral to developing any skill. Through them, you learn what clearly works and what does not. Setbacks serve to underline the bad habits that cause them. A whole week of writing may die by the cuts of a thousand quotidian habits that have little to do with writing itself. These habits can rob one of the motivation, energy, and focus required to write consistently.

Even having one or two beers after work might prevent me from writing that evening. I begin to lose focus, become prone to distraction, and generally do not produce well under a buzz. I’ve realized that I’m not made in the romanticized image of the writer sitting down to work with a glass of wine. And so in an effort to make my evenings after work more productive, I’ve decided to cut out all alcohol during the week and drink only on Fridays and Saturdays, when I have more free time to sleep in and shake off a hangover.

Another bad habit: browsing my smartphone in bed before I fall asleep. I lose at least an hour of sleep a night to backlit screens, which can trigger an increase in cortisol levels, making it more difficult to fall asleep. This loss of sleep in turn affects my ability to wake up early enough in the morning to read and write before work, and at the end of the day I feel my energy levels much more depleted than usual. Lately, I’ve struggled even just to get up in time for work. No more screens in bed, then, and I’ve got to focus more on getting a full night’s rest.

I have reason to be optimistic though. Many of the habits that affect my writing also affect the quality of my strength conditioning and workout at the gym. Since I’m going to start training in Muay Thai in the next couple of weeks, on top of the kettlebell routines I already do, I can’t afford to drink much during the week or to get less than 8 hours of sleep a night. The extra demands I’ll be putting on my body will force the changes in habit I also need to start writing more consistently.

By Sunday at the very latest, I’ll finally get around to writing about my new methods of research organization. As I’ve said before, I appreciate any comments or feedback any of you might have.

Emplacing and rebuilding

For as long as I can remember, I’ve regarded my writing process as a mysterious unfolding of an idea. The arrival of this idea is usually spontaneous, emerging suddenly like Waldo’s red stripes from amongst a throng of colorful sweaters and floppy beach hats — sometimes false stripes catch the eye and fool. Though, even as I land upon a good idea, it never seems to establish itself as necessary. From it doesn’t inexorably flow some new, groundbreaking reading, as though I had discovered some new conceptual frame that breathes new life into an old text. Everything hardly ever falls in place; one thought rarely begs another, no matter how enthusiastically I cajole my reader. I’m almost certainly not alone in this struggle, but If I’m being honest, I’ve never completed a research project without feeling the panic of the ground giving beneath my feet. I’ve never built for my writing a good solid foundation, and I’ve most definitely never drawn up blueprints for a structure I could use when constructing the early beams and columns of each research project I begin. My writing has always lacked a process for collecting, organizing, and contextualizing research materials.

I’m resurrecting my tumblr as a weekly blog about the development of a new writing process for my research projects. For the most part, I’ll need to unlearn many of the habits I relied upon in college, and so I hope maintaining this blog will create a productive place to reflect on those habits and develop new ones. I welcome any and all feedback from my readers, and I’d also love if you shared some details about your own writing process.

My next post will come next Sunday, when I’ll explain some of the initial changes I’ve made to the way I organize my research materials.

christianlapidge:

Syd Mead’s LA

A Family of four and their robots, 25 years from now” - A view of the future from 1988, including these amazing images from Syd Mead.

Download the full article at the LA Times.

(via memoriastoica)

anechoicchamber:

There’s a few different ways to approach something as overdetermined as a gender binary. One of those angles is performance - female is considered to be a performed gender, while male is considered to be unperformed. This is oversimplified (and wrong) of course, but what’s interesting is the way in which more socially accepted forms of gender boundary crossing tend to maintain this axis of performance. Drag as the practice of men dressing up like women is an ancient practice, seen as odd by many but fundamentally socially legible because in performing a gender, a man must of course read as female. Similarly, when women decline gender performance, refusing to wear makeup or otherwise maintain feminine bodies, they are read as becoming-male. Some see these lines as in need of policing, but even most those who accept the practices read them through this axis of performativity.
Witness the largely successful attempts to feminize “meterosexuality” in the early 2000’s and the broadly conservative restorative movement in men’s fashion that we are currently living through. The dandyism of blogs like Put This On is an interesting counterpoint, but one that relies heavily on economic distancing as the third term between performativity and gender. What other kinds of third terms could there be in fashion?
This picture (I have no source for it, sadly) is of a girl approaching the masculine quality of sprezzatura, the studied carelessness and casual projection of power in dress that defines masculinity (and that I still regard as a hallmark of beauty). This is an emotional and aesthetic quality of clothing that implies an item has been lived in for thousands of hours. In attempting this quality this girl is approaching a double reversal of gender: a female performing masculinity. What would a male not performing femininity look like? There’s gotta be something on tumblr…
(see From a Left Wing’s post on David Beckham as a Lesbian Icon. One of my favorite pieces of hers, I re-read it on the occasion of Beckham’s retirement and have been thinking about it ever since.)

anechoicchamber:

There’s a few different ways to approach something as overdetermined as a gender binary. One of those angles is performance - female is considered to be a performed gender, while male is considered to be unperformed. This is oversimplified (and wrong) of course, but what’s interesting is the way in which more socially accepted forms of gender boundary crossing tend to maintain this axis of performance. Drag as the practice of men dressing up like women is an ancient practice, seen as odd by many but fundamentally socially legible because in performing a gender, a man must of course read as female. Similarly, when women decline gender performance, refusing to wear makeup or otherwise maintain feminine bodies, they are read as becoming-male. Some see these lines as in need of policing, but even most those who accept the practices read them through this axis of performativity.

Witness the largely successful attempts to feminize “meterosexuality” in the early 2000’s and the broadly conservative restorative movement in men’s fashion that we are currently living through. The dandyism of blogs like Put This On is an interesting counterpoint, but one that relies heavily on economic distancing as the third term between performativity and gender. What other kinds of third terms could there be in fashion?

This picture (I have no source for it, sadly) is of a girl approaching the masculine quality of sprezzatura, the studied carelessness and casual projection of power in dress that defines masculinity (and that I still regard as a hallmark of beauty). This is an emotional and aesthetic quality of clothing that implies an item has been lived in for thousands of hours. In attempting this quality this girl is approaching a double reversal of gender: a female performing masculinity. What would a male not performing femininity look like? There’s gotta be something on tumblr…

(see From a Left Wing’s post on David Beckham as a Lesbian Icon. One of my favorite pieces of hers, I re-read it on the occasion of Beckham’s retirement and have been thinking about it ever since.)

  • Congregant: Father, did Christ have strong muscles?
  • Priest: Yes, my son. The Son of God was cut, and ripped, and his definition was good.
  • Congregant: Did he lift, and if he did, could he have done many reps?
  • Priest: It stands to reason he did, and could.
losangelespast:



“Silverwoods, Hart Schaffner & Marx, Clothes”: The Miracle Mile, 1936.



In case anybody is wondering, this building is the Wilshire Tower Building, completed in 1929.
As far as I know, now the building is home to a Fedex and the Los Angeles location of the Ace Gallery. The western end of the building used to house a Hollywood Video, and remains vacant today, but you can still see the vestiges of the store signage above the storefront windows.

losangelespast:

“Silverwoods, Hart Schaffner & Marx, Clothes”: The Miracle Mile, 1936.

In case anybody is wondering, this building is the Wilshire Tower Building, completed in 1929.

As far as I know, now the building is home to a Fedex and the Los Angeles location of the Ace Gallery. The western end of the building used to house a Hollywood Video, and remains vacant today, but you can still see the vestiges of the store signage above the storefront windows.

Real Estate or Utility? Surging Data Center Industry Blurs Boundaries

Standing before a bank of servers, Mr. Starr explained that they belonged to one of the lesser-known exchanges located in the Secaucus data center. Multicolored fiber-optic cables drop from an overhead track into the cage, which allows servers of traders and other financial players elsewhere on the floor to monitor and react nearly instantaneously to the exchange. It all creates a dense and unthinkably fast ecosystem of postmodern finance.

A new strategy of wealth accumulation centered on making use of emergent geographies of production. Commercial real estate markets intersect with electrical power utilities in order to fulfill operational and growth requirements of a postmodern information economy. Simultaneously, the geographical dynamism of power and space produces new possibilities for finance and tech capital that redouble into a new fictitious economy of space, probably with its own set of concomitant credit markets.
I wonder what David Harvey would say about this?
intheperiphery:

People enjoying a picnic in the middle of a highway during the 1973 oil crisis.

intheperiphery:

People enjoying a picnic in the middle of a highway during the 1973 oil crisis.

(via anechoicchamber)

Delays and setbacks

I’ve already failed to make this resurrected tumblr a weekly blog on writing process. But I should know by now that setbacks are inevitable for someone who never had much writing discipline in the first place. I want to offer some reasons why I failed not only to update this blog but also to work regularly on my writing sample these past couple of weeks.

It’s important to remember as well that setbacks are integral to developing any skill. Through them, you learn what clearly works and what does not. Setbacks serve to underline the bad habits that cause them. A whole week of writing may die by the cuts of a thousand quotidian habits that have little to do with writing itself. These habits can rob one of the motivation, energy, and focus required to write consistently.

Even having one or two beers after work might prevent me from writing that evening. I begin to lose focus, become prone to distraction, and generally do not produce well under a buzz. I’ve realized that I’m not made in the romanticized image of the writer sitting down to work with a glass of wine. And so in an effort to make my evenings after work more productive, I’ve decided to cut out all alcohol during the week and drink only on Fridays and Saturdays, when I have more free time to sleep in and shake off a hangover.

Another bad habit: browsing my smartphone in bed before I fall asleep. I lose at least an hour of sleep a night to backlit screens, which can trigger an increase in cortisol levels, making it more difficult to fall asleep. This loss of sleep in turn affects my ability to wake up early enough in the morning to read and write before work, and at the end of the day I feel my energy levels much more depleted than usual. Lately, I’ve struggled even just to get up in time for work. No more screens in bed, then, and I’ve got to focus more on getting a full night’s rest.

I have reason to be optimistic though. Many of the habits that affect my writing also affect the quality of my strength conditioning and workout at the gym. Since I’m going to start training in Muay Thai in the next couple of weeks, on top of the kettlebell routines I already do, I can’t afford to drink much during the week or to get less than 8 hours of sleep a night. The extra demands I’ll be putting on my body will force the changes in habit I also need to start writing more consistently.

By Sunday at the very latest, I’ll finally get around to writing about my new methods of research organization. As I’ve said before, I appreciate any comments or feedback any of you might have.

Emplacing and rebuilding

For as long as I can remember, I’ve regarded my writing process as a mysterious unfolding of an idea. The arrival of this idea is usually spontaneous, emerging suddenly like Waldo’s red stripes from amongst a throng of colorful sweaters and floppy beach hats — sometimes false stripes catch the eye and fool. Though, even as I land upon a good idea, it never seems to establish itself as necessary. From it doesn’t inexorably flow some new, groundbreaking reading, as though I had discovered some new conceptual frame that breathes new life into an old text. Everything hardly ever falls in place; one thought rarely begs another, no matter how enthusiastically I cajole my reader. I’m almost certainly not alone in this struggle, but If I’m being honest, I’ve never completed a research project without feeling the panic of the ground giving beneath my feet. I’ve never built for my writing a good solid foundation, and I’ve most definitely never drawn up blueprints for a structure I could use when constructing the early beams and columns of each research project I begin. My writing has always lacked a process for collecting, organizing, and contextualizing research materials.

I’m resurrecting my tumblr as a weekly blog about the development of a new writing process for my research projects. For the most part, I’ll need to unlearn many of the habits I relied upon in college, and so I hope maintaining this blog will create a productive place to reflect on those habits and develop new ones. I welcome any and all feedback from my readers, and I’d also love if you shared some details about your own writing process.

My next post will come next Sunday, when I’ll explain some of the initial changes I’ve made to the way I organize my research materials.

christianlapidge:

Syd Mead’s LA

A Family of four and their robots, 25 years from now” - A view of the future from 1988, including these amazing images from Syd Mead.

Download the full article at the LA Times.

(via memoriastoica)

anechoicchamber:

There’s a few different ways to approach something as overdetermined as a gender binary. One of those angles is performance - female is considered to be a performed gender, while male is considered to be unperformed. This is oversimplified (and wrong) of course, but what’s interesting is the way in which more socially accepted forms of gender boundary crossing tend to maintain this axis of performance. Drag as the practice of men dressing up like women is an ancient practice, seen as odd by many but fundamentally socially legible because in performing a gender, a man must of course read as female. Similarly, when women decline gender performance, refusing to wear makeup or otherwise maintain feminine bodies, they are read as becoming-male. Some see these lines as in need of policing, but even most those who accept the practices read them through this axis of performativity.
Witness the largely successful attempts to feminize “meterosexuality” in the early 2000’s and the broadly conservative restorative movement in men’s fashion that we are currently living through. The dandyism of blogs like Put This On is an interesting counterpoint, but one that relies heavily on economic distancing as the third term between performativity and gender. What other kinds of third terms could there be in fashion?
This picture (I have no source for it, sadly) is of a girl approaching the masculine quality of sprezzatura, the studied carelessness and casual projection of power in dress that defines masculinity (and that I still regard as a hallmark of beauty). This is an emotional and aesthetic quality of clothing that implies an item has been lived in for thousands of hours. In attempting this quality this girl is approaching a double reversal of gender: a female performing masculinity. What would a male not performing femininity look like? There’s gotta be something on tumblr…
(see From a Left Wing’s post on David Beckham as a Lesbian Icon. One of my favorite pieces of hers, I re-read it on the occasion of Beckham’s retirement and have been thinking about it ever since.)

anechoicchamber:

There’s a few different ways to approach something as overdetermined as a gender binary. One of those angles is performance - female is considered to be a performed gender, while male is considered to be unperformed. This is oversimplified (and wrong) of course, but what’s interesting is the way in which more socially accepted forms of gender boundary crossing tend to maintain this axis of performance. Drag as the practice of men dressing up like women is an ancient practice, seen as odd by many but fundamentally socially legible because in performing a gender, a man must of course read as female. Similarly, when women decline gender performance, refusing to wear makeup or otherwise maintain feminine bodies, they are read as becoming-male. Some see these lines as in need of policing, but even most those who accept the practices read them through this axis of performativity.

Witness the largely successful attempts to feminize “meterosexuality” in the early 2000’s and the broadly conservative restorative movement in men’s fashion that we are currently living through. The dandyism of blogs like Put This On is an interesting counterpoint, but one that relies heavily on economic distancing as the third term between performativity and gender. What other kinds of third terms could there be in fashion?

This picture (I have no source for it, sadly) is of a girl approaching the masculine quality of sprezzatura, the studied carelessness and casual projection of power in dress that defines masculinity (and that I still regard as a hallmark of beauty). This is an emotional and aesthetic quality of clothing that implies an item has been lived in for thousands of hours. In attempting this quality this girl is approaching a double reversal of gender: a female performing masculinity. What would a male not performing femininity look like? There’s gotta be something on tumblr…

(see From a Left Wing’s post on David Beckham as a Lesbian Icon. One of my favorite pieces of hers, I re-read it on the occasion of Beckham’s retirement and have been thinking about it ever since.)

  • Congregant: Father, did Christ have strong muscles?
  • Priest: Yes, my son. The Son of God was cut, and ripped, and his definition was good.
  • Congregant: Did he lift, and if he did, could he have done many reps?
  • Priest: It stands to reason he did, and could.

(Source: sinidentidades, via llevelling)

losangelespast:



“Silverwoods, Hart Schaffner & Marx, Clothes”: The Miracle Mile, 1936.



In case anybody is wondering, this building is the Wilshire Tower Building, completed in 1929.
As far as I know, now the building is home to a Fedex and the Los Angeles location of the Ace Gallery. The western end of the building used to house a Hollywood Video, and remains vacant today, but you can still see the vestiges of the store signage above the storefront windows.

losangelespast:

“Silverwoods, Hart Schaffner & Marx, Clothes”: The Miracle Mile, 1936.

In case anybody is wondering, this building is the Wilshire Tower Building, completed in 1929.

As far as I know, now the building is home to a Fedex and the Los Angeles location of the Ace Gallery. The western end of the building used to house a Hollywood Video, and remains vacant today, but you can still see the vestiges of the store signage above the storefront windows.

Real Estate or Utility? Surging Data Center Industry Blurs Boundaries

Standing before a bank of servers, Mr. Starr explained that they belonged to one of the lesser-known exchanges located in the Secaucus data center. Multicolored fiber-optic cables drop from an overhead track into the cage, which allows servers of traders and other financial players elsewhere on the floor to monitor and react nearly instantaneously to the exchange. It all creates a dense and unthinkably fast ecosystem of postmodern finance.

A new strategy of wealth accumulation centered on making use of emergent geographies of production. Commercial real estate markets intersect with electrical power utilities in order to fulfill operational and growth requirements of a postmodern information economy. Simultaneously, the geographical dynamism of power and space produces new possibilities for finance and tech capital that redouble into a new fictitious economy of space, probably with its own set of concomitant credit markets.
I wonder what David Harvey would say about this?
intheperiphery:

People enjoying a picnic in the middle of a highway during the 1973 oil crisis.

intheperiphery:

People enjoying a picnic in the middle of a highway during the 1973 oil crisis.

(via anechoicchamber)

Delays and setbacks
Emplacing and rebuilding

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